Focus on the Essence

Updated: Jan 28, 2019

Today we will be focusing on the essence of our two minute films. Mark will give us a brief presentation on what this entails, then we will go into groups to give and receive feedback on our film ideas. This afternoon we will develop a log line for our film.


A log line is a 2 sentence synopsis off our film, otherwise known as an elevator pitch.


Should have gone to specsavers - 2016

Adverts are roughly 30 second and contain a simple but fully completed story.


The opening of the advert is a establishing shot, we know we are in a museum. The pace of the advert is controlled by the rhythm of turning light switches off. There are close ups to emphasise the lights turning off, and we associate the sound of the switch with the action of flipping the switch. As the guard walks around turning off the lights, we are shown that there are many statues in the museum. The gag of the advert is the guard breaking a statue, the audience know this because the sound effect used is different to the light switch. The end line is, 'should've gone to specsavers'.



Glen Keane

Glen Keane is well know for his Disney animations in Pocahontas, The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, Tarzan, Beauty and the Beast and Treasure Planet.


We used Glen Keane's Animation Guide for making a film to discuss points of interest in stories.


We need to keep in mind these notes when making our films, is it telling the story visually? Is it holding the audiences attention?


Short Stories

Short stories are 4-12 pages long. It will be beneficial to read short stories to understand how they are written as full stories without going into unnecessary detail.


Suggested Authors

-Ray Brandon -Raymond Carvor -Stephan King - (he sells the right to his short stories to students for $1)

-Tove Jansson - (writes the moomins)

- Niel Giaman


In a short story there are two actions Static action - repeated actions by the character that doesn't move the story

Moving Action - a new action that triggers change and moves the story.

A moved character is the protagonist, they must change in someway throughout the film. The change doesn't have to be huge, it can be small.


E.g. WALLE The first 20 minutes of Walle shows the routine of the character - Static action

When the red dot appears, it changes Walle's routine - Moving Action


Theme - What is the message? Story - How do you tell the message?


Aesop's Fables is a series of short stories of morality.

http://www.taleswithmorals.com


Group


In my group - Ronan, Jess, Jordan, me


I made notes while listening to everyones ideas.


We had 15 minutes each to tell our ideas and to give feedback.



My Feedback

  • Do research

  • Talk to people

  • Who is your target audience? - millenials/ x-gen /those who are too young to remember mines but old enough to be interested.

  • Shadows could turn into modern technology - shows technological progression.

  • Show the danders of mines - collapses and boulders ect...

  • Shadows move/throw their tools

  • Use ulan as a reference - opening credits the painting scene.

  • In the beginning, have the main character put his helmet on in the house and THEN follow the shadow.

Mark

  • Puppets holding their lanterns - creates a back light

  • Introduce the strike of 83/4 slowly

  • Be aware that the use of shadows as miners may have different meanings, e.g. miners were disposable,

  • Helmets could be used to symbolise the end of the mine.

  • It will be easy to edit and do colour correction in post if I film the set and the shadows separately

  • Film the puppets on the set, paint the set green and do green screen in post

  • Can make the animatic in Maya using simple shapes and screenshooting the screen. I can then draw over the pictures for my animatic.


I'm hesitant to paint the set all green, but if it needs to I'll do it. I'd rather keep the set in its original colour incase I need to do reshoots because it will be difficult to paint it the original colour again in the detail I want to.


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